Princess Marina – The first Duchess of Style

March 21st, 2011


We live in an age when royal princesses can be seen as style icons. Princess Diana, Princess Margaret, Princess Grace of Monaco  and Queen Rania of Jordan have all been admired for their fashion choices and style, and it seems that Kate Middleton is about to join their feted ranks. But the original style Princess is hardly remembered today. She was Princess Marina of Greece, who married Prince George, the youngest and most handsome son of George V in 1934 and became the Duchess of Kent.

Marina was a tall, beautiful women with an impeccable sense of style. No ingenue when she married the Prince, but an independent women of 28, she became a beloved icon of style for both the general public and the fashion magazines. Her tall, slim frame was perfect for the long bias cut dresses of the 1930s, and, along with Wallis Simpson, she epitomised the elegance of the decade, bringing some much-needed Hollywood glamour to the British Royal Family.

Marina and George became the glamorous couple of the royal family in the 1930s. Her photograph often appeared in Vogue, with photographers like Horst immortalizing her image. Marina gave birth to three children,but her happiness was not to last. George, Duke of Kent was killed in a plane crash in 1942 leaving Marina a widow at the young age of 34. She never remarried, but remained a popular and elegant presence in the Royal family until her own death in 1968.



4 Responses to “Princess Marina – The first Duchess of Style”

  1. Piggle says:

    Never heard of her, but I love these old photographs, she looked amazing.

  2. John Devins says:

    I remember as an 8 year old boy getting up early with my family one morning in late 1934
    to drive and be at my grandmother’s home by 5.00 AM so that we could hear on grandmother’s radio the wedding of Prince George, the Duke of Kent, to Princess Marina, who became the Duchess of Kent.
    John Devins.

  3. Sandra says:

    Informative post. I have a lovely wedding gown knitting pattern from the 1930s that was named after her, but I didn’t know anything about her. Perhaps I should upload the pattern to my blog.

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