Muddy Boots Storage With Vintage Apple Crates

One of the negative point people often mention when they are talking about storage solutions is how unattractive it can be. Go to Ikea and you will find acres and acres of plastic boxes that work well but look pretty horrible if we are being honest. If only there was some way to make storage more attractive.

Vintage Apple Crates do just that. Using sourced genuine vintage apple crates that have been sanded down, the sturdy and roomy crates are perfect for storing a range of objects. They have a gorgeous rustic look that will appeal to lovers of vintage and retro styling, but as they have also been upcycled, they are totally in keeping with our passion for recycling and reusing objects, something that is becoming more and more important in our ever throwaway society.

One of their most popular and useful products is their Muddy Boots crate. With Winter firmly taking a grip we are all looking for somewhere to store those wet and snowy wellies, and this continues into Spring, when rain brings us muddy paths and parks, particularly in semi rural areas like the one I live in. The muddy boots crate is roomy ( Crate Size: 50cm Length x 40cm Depth x 30cm Height) and attractive, with vintage style lettering on the front that has been hand stenciled to match in with the rustic/vintage feel.

Each crate has a larger gap under the top slat in each side so they can be easily carried when full. This means you can carry it outside when the weather warms up, and keep it somewhere inside, whether than be a shed or garage, or, like me, kept in the conservatory near to the back door so you can take your boots straight off when you come in from the garden.

How you store your boots is up to you, you can stand them up neatly, or just through them in, either way is fine – you may find more room for storage is they are thrown in randomly like I have done.

I love the vintage look and feel of the muddy boots crate and think they are a great addition to any home.

Sprucing Up Your Home For The New Year

Ok, you’ve done the run-up to Christmas, the actual Christmas bit, the run-up to New Year and the actual New Year. You could be forgiven for feeling a little jaded. But those New Year’s resolutions really aren’t going to happen unless you do something constructive about them.

Well, one way of making a difference – and it doesn’t have to be a resolution, just something you really want to do – is giving your home a makeover and adding a whole range of new styles to spruce it all up. It’s not that difficult and you don’t have to spend a fortune, especially if there has been the odd maxed credit card over the festive season.

So let’s take a look at some ideas to help stimulate your design juices.

Hello 2018!

Ready or not, here it is, and you have 12 months of it ahead. Now 2017 has gone with the fairies, you don’t have to channel white on white any more. Yes, it was, and still can be attractive, but if you want to move with the times, look at ways to break up white, perhaps by using a black trim to make a statement.

Different rooms require different design solutions, so think about what will work best for you in individual rooms.

Living spaces

Apart from the bedroom, these are spaces you will spend most time in, so you want them to be comfortable but have an attractive decor that adds to that relaxed feel you want. This year, it seems that lavender, lilac and violet are on the colour agenda, and with so many hues to choose from, you can paint soft-toned walls, perhaps accentuating with a splash of pink to draw the eye but still provide a comforting environment.

It’s not just paint that can make the difference. You can incorporate these colours into your home with artfully placed throw rugs, artwork and pillows. In the end, it comes down to your own eye and what you feel works best in your living spaces.

Window coverings

It might sound boring but the way you decide to cover your windows can make a major impact on not just how your living spaces appear, but also on the other rooms in your home. Curtains and blinds are often the go-to solution and can be attractive additions to the decor, especially in terms of colours and decorations.

A popular alternative is to use window shutters that add a real sense of style to your rooms. They are easy to install (you can do it yourself if you prefer) and can be made to fit any size or style of window. Half-moon, bay or just standard sizes, you can find a range of wood and other materials to suit the way you want your home to look. Affordable shutters give you options that are worth considering when you go for your home makeover.

Work on your lighting

It’s easy to forget how important good lighting is in any room. Take the bathroom, for example. If you don’t have good light, whether it’s from a window, overhead electric or quality mirror lighting, then you’re going to have dissatisfied family and guests who are trying to shave or wash without being able to see clearly.

Take that on to your kitchen. When you’re making food, you need to see what’s going on. Darkness can foster danger, so look to LED ceiling lights and under-counter lighting to put yourself on top of all the culinary challenges that you – and others – need to deal with.

Your main living spaces also need appropriate lighting. Have a mixture of bright options for the early evening as people are beginning to settle down after dinner, and use dimmer switches with a remote control to gradually bring down the brightness and create a different ambience. Strategically placed lamps with attractive shades, either placed on the table or as uplighters, can add to that feeling of relaxation. Spotlights can subtly illuminate wall areas, especially if there is artwork you would like to be seen.

During the day, this is where shutters can improve the natural light because they can be adjusted to let in as much or as little light as you want. In colder months, they also act as an additional layer of insulation.

Choose what suits you

Whether it’s moving furniture around, doing some decluttering to free up spaces, painting or putting in new window coverings, rugs or throws, the sky’s the limit. Be imaginative, explore your options and have a beautiful home for the rest of the year.

Open Or Broken-Plan? A New Design Trend

Multi-functional rooms have been popular for a long time, they allow you to use your space in a way that suits you, and this seems to be a practical option that appeals. Many of these rooms are open plan. However, once we have opened up our homes from many small rooms to one big one, this can cause problems. One room zoned into specific areas for cooking, dining and relaxing appears to be a dream, but is the reality somewhat different? Together with Harvey Jones, fitters of bespoke fitted kitchens, lets take a look at this new kitchen trend.

Living in open-plan spaces

When leading a sociable lifestyle, entertaining guests can be difficult if you are short of space. This is why open-plan areas can seem like such a convenient solution. For multi-functional rooms that include a kitchen, the benefits are clear. It prevents the cook from feeling isolated for a start, allowing them to feel part of the conversation or action. A bespoke kitchen scheme that includes an island or peninsula that looks out onto the rest of the space means that cooking and preparing food need no longer be a solitary process.

Going open plan is also great if you have children. From toddlers playing to teens doing their homework, for busy families a space that performs several functions allows the family to spend time together even when they’re performing many different tasks.

House sizes are decreasing year on year, and that’s why an open-plan kitchen/diner can seem like a good alternative to a separate dining room that may take up too much space. A kitchen/diner can be a good way of maximising space and design. However, you do have to be careful when planning a multi-functional room,  do all the zones work well together? You must also recognize and accept that this kind of layout will reduce privacy, particularly if you’re opening up the whole of your downstairs. Having nowhere quiet to retire while the kids watch TV or play can become a problem. Noise from appliances might disturb you or that clearly evident pile of washing-up could nag at you as you sit down for an evening of TV or a quiet read. Fewer walls also mean less space to put furniture, which can lead to a room that’s crammed around the walls or jumbled in the centre. And don’t forget those food smells that will now clog all spaces.

How can design move on from open-plan living?

As a new trend for 2018, broken-plan living can set the new precedent in interior design trends, replacing open plan in the future. The idea is to retain all the things you love about open-plan – particularly the light and openness – while at the same time zoning the space to allow for more privacy should you need it. Rather than doing this with colours and textures as you would in a true open-plan arrangements, broken-plan employs structural elements such as half-walls, dividing shelves, changing levels, walls of glass and even mezzanines to delineate and formalise areas for different uses.

How does this trend look?

By cordoning off certain areas to create new spaces, ‘walls’ can be created by using boxed shelving and other furniture to define spaces that weren’t previously there in the room. Of course, you don’t want to regress back to small poky rooms, so don’t cram the shelves full of books – instead, artfully arrange a few favourite pieces to signal the change between one room and another and leave some of the shelves open to allow light to freely cascade from one zone to another. If you’re just starting your project, consider just knocking down half a wall and leaving the top open, allowing sight-lines through but at the same time giving you more wall space to play with.

As well as this trend, Crittall-style windows have also become a popular interior design trend. Metal framed windows and sometimes doors traditionally used in industrial spaces or as exterior walls onto gardens have celebrity fans such as TV presenter and architect George Clarke, who celebrates their ability to cleverly divide an internal space without shutting off one room totally from another.

Broken-plan spaces can accommodate changing floor and ceiling heights – helping to bring spaces together that usually wouldn’t work as an open plan space. With broken-plan living, the options are unlimited when it comes to your interior design space.