Why might you need a lawyer?

For most of us, the law is something that affects other people. You see the news stories with the TV crews outside the courtrooms and you hear about friends of friends who have found themselves in a legal pickle, but not you. You go to work, you pay your bills, and you don’t go looking for trouble. Life is easy. We look out for each other and we don’t create problems. Right? 

That’s how we all think and operate. Issues arise where trouble comes looking for us. And when it does, you’re going to need legal representation. Have you ever heard a judge call on either the defence or the prosecution to speak for the first time, by first establishing the person’s identity and confirming that they wish to represent themselves? And how many of you have thought “well, that’s, that’s one way to do it, not the smart way, they’re probably going to lose, that’s not how I’d do it” … exactly. When trouble comes knocking, don’t back out on seeking a lawyer. Let’s look at common reasons people need a lawyer.

All things automobile

Grand theft auto is more than a video game. It’s a very real daily legal concern for millions of people. When it comes to the road, you need legal assistance. From bumps and scrapes to all out car accidents with serious outcomes (see here for more info). The information provided to you by lawyers can make sure that the other side is not left with a free run at you – get the best result possible.

Buying and selling properties

Conveyancing (or buying and selling properties) is one of the most common reasons to seek legal assistance. Issues around paperwork and structural or superficial problems with the property are endless, and often remain at the forefront of matters right up until the very last moment of handing over the keys. 

Reclaiming debt

Neither a borrower nor a lender be. Thank you, Bill Shake. But loans are a part of real life, and when you are owed money with no sign of repayments (or if repayments have halted), legal assistance is the way forward. Sometimes, you may feel like this is a heavy-handed solution because the person that owes the money is, in fact, a friend or family member (or an otherwise agreeable tenant), but by not paying you what is owed, they have already broken that trust. 

 

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